Boards oppose NMPF’s dairy policy package

September 25th, 2020

first_imgThe leaders of the International Dairy Foods Association’s (IDFA) three constituent organizations voted to support IDFA’s dairy policy reform recommendations and to oppose the National Milk Producers Federation’s dairy policy package.The directors of the Milk Industry Foundation, the National Cheese Institute and the International Ice Cream Association met this weekend to review current policy reform proposals and approved the IDFA’s policy recommendations that would reform the Federal Milk Marketing Orders and provide a better safety net for dairy farmers.advertisementadvertisement “IDFA’s plan offers an alternative path forward that would not limit milk supply through a new mandatory government program and will give dairy farmers the tools they need to manage volatility,” said Connie Tipton, IDFA president and CEO. “We support policy initiatives—many of which are included in the Dairy Industry Advisory Committee recommendations—that will help our industry grow, not only through increased consumption here in the U.S., but by taking advantage of new and growing export opportunities.”IDFA’s policy recommendations will replace existing safety net programs with better risk management tools for producers. IDFA proposals will also reform the Federal Milk Marketing Order system from a complex, outdated program to a system that is simpler and encourages growth within the industry.”Our members believe that it is time to decrease regulations in a highly regulated industry and the National Milk policy package does just the opposite,” said Tipton.Recommendations include:Replacing the outdated and ineffective Dairy Product Price Support Program (DPPSP) and Dairy Export Incentive Program (DEIP) with better risk management tools for producersStrengthening dairy risk management tools, including forward contracting, the Livestock Gross Margin-Dairy program, catastrophic margin insurance for all dairy farmers and tax-deferred farm savings accountsSimplifying the Federal Milk Marketing Orders program PD—From IDFA news releaseadvertisementlast_img read more

University of New Hampshire-led project to boost Northeast organic dairy industry

September 25th, 2020

first_imgResearchers from the University of New Hampshire are leading a multi-state project that aims to help organic dairy farmers better produce and market their milk.Funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) to 12 researchers from the universities of Maine, Vermont, Cornell and the USDA, as well as UNH, the research will explore how organic dairy farmers in the Northeast can enhance farm profitability by extending the grazing season and adding value to milk through flaxseed supplementation.advertisementadvertisement “Organic milk production has been one of the fastest growing segments of organic agriculture in the nation in the past decade, and the Northeast produces approximately 25 percent of the organic milk in the U.S.,” says principal investigator André Brito, assistant professor of organic dairy management at UNH. “Organic represents a tremendous potential to maintain rural economies and preserve working environmental landscapes through profitable organic dairy farms.””As more and more farmers adopt organic agriculture practices, they need the best science available to operate profitable and successful organic farms,” says Kathleen Merrigan, deputy secretary of the USDA.”America’s brand of organic agricultural goods is world-renowned for its high quality and abundance of selection. These research and extension projects will give producers the tools and resources to produce quality organic food and boost farm income, boosting the ‘Grown in America’ brand.”The project, which was funded through NIFA’s Organic Research and Extension Initiative, addresses needs expressed by organic dairy farmers in a series of focus group interviews funded by two planning grants.”Organic dairy farmers were specifically concerned about the new pasture rule,” says Brito, noting a new federal standard that dictates ruminant animals must graze on pasture 120 days per year with about 30 percent of the total intake coming from pasture. Extending the grazing season has potential to reduce feed costs, a major obstacle to profitability for organic dairies.advertisementBecause extending the grazing season means keeping cows on pasture longer, researchers will conduct plot trials of various combinations of forage species, including perennial ryegrass, white clover, sorghum-sudan grass, brassicas, and small grains. The challenge in the Northeast, says Brito, is not only the late start and early finish of the growing season but also the heat of the summer, when many forage species are less productive.The second research question – enhancing milk quality – also concerns what cows eat. Cows on pasture produce milk rich with omega-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), molecules sought after for their human health benefits. For Northeast organic dairy farmers to tap the added value of omega-3 fatty acids and CLA, however, they need to ensure high levels of these throughout the year, not just when cows are on pasture.In this project, the researchers hypothesize that supplementing cows’ winter forage with flaxseed will sustain omega-3 fatty acids and CLA concentrations, meeting year-round market demands for milk with improved fatty acid profile, and possibly commanding higher prices in the marketplace in the future. Further, the researchers will explore how flaxseed enhances milk production and improves cow health and reproductive performance.Because both research questions transcend dairy cows to embrace a wider agro-ecosystem – from soils to pasture plants to nutrients available to cows and thus to humans – the project is by its nature interdisciplinary, says Brito. His UNH colleagues on the project are assistant professor of agroecology Richard Smith, associate professor of reproductive physiology Dave Townson, and assistant professor of plant pathology Kirk Broders.A core team composed of animal scientists, economists, agronomists, ecologists, and Extension educators from partner institutions and 20 organic dairy farmers throughout the Northeast are involved in the four-year project, which is supported by a nearly $2.9 million grant from the USDA.The project taps the unique resource of UNH’s Organic Dairy Research Farm, the first organic dairy farm at a U.S. land grand university and the only one in the Northeast. All animal feeding trials will take place within the UNH herd of 50 organic milking Jerseys, and plot trials will utilize the farm’s 300 acres in Lee, as well as research farms at partner institutions.advertisementBrito stresses that although this project arose to directly address needs of organic dairy farmers in the Northeast, its benefits will transcend that group to include conventional dairy farmers transitioning to organic or any dairy farmers who wish to adopt grazing systems. “It’s not only the organic dairy producer who will gain from this research,” he says. “We’ll be generating information that can be used by the whole dairy industry, including conventional and organic dairy farmers outside the Northeast.”In addition to UNH’s Brito, Smith, Townson, and Broders, investigators on this project are agronomist Heather Darby, associate extension professor Sidney Bosworth, and economics professor Bob Parsons, all from the University of Vermont; Richard Kersbergen, professor of sustainable dairy and forage systems from the University of Maine Cooperative Extension; A. Fay Benson from Cornell University Cooperative Extension; and animal scientist Kathy Soder, plant physiologist R. Howard Skinner, and ecologist Sarah Goslee, all from the USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Pasture Systems and Watershed Management Research Unity, located in University Park, Penn. PD—EurekAlert! press releaselast_img read more

Don’t panic as prices fall

September 25th, 2020

first_imgWhat does your marketing plan look like for 2015? As I write this, April 2015 Class III milk futures prices are trading in the neighborhood of $14.40 per hundredweight (cwt), $10 less than the September 2014 Class III peak of $24.60 only seven months earlier.advertisementadvertisement We all want to forget the $10 Class III price crash that occurred from June 2008 to February 2009, but can we? The eight consecutive months of Class III prices below $12 at the bottom of that cycle caused the real damage to dairy farm balance sheets during 2009. What can we learn from history?Milk prices continue to ride the roller coaster that is becoming a normal part of the dairy industry in the U.S. Last summer, we saw that when the demand for dairy products, especially butter, grew more than the supply, prices climbed quickly and dramatically. Today, we are witnessing what happens when the world supply of dairy products surpasses consumer demand around the world.Dairymen are concerned that dairy exports from the U.S. are slowing down as the dollar strengthens against other currencies, even though exports are still well above 2012 levels. Milk production quotas are ending in Europe as these countries struggle to maintain economic growth. Dairy product inventories and cow numbers are increasing here in the U.S. as our cows continue to produce more milk.The positive signs for the dairy industry include feed costs that are much lower than they have been in recent years. High cull cow prices should quickly reduce the U.S. dairy herd as farms respond to these low milk prices. Consumer confidence is steadily increasing in the U.S. as our economy continues to grow. Over the long term, consumers across the globe expect to improve their diet by eating more dairy products.Using the USDA’s Margin Protection Program forecasted margins as a barometer, margins may drop below $7 for several months from March through July, but today’s futures markets anticipate a recovery to more than $9 margins by next fall at $16 Class III milk prices.advertisementIn today’s lower-feed-cost environment, we need to look at the margin to gain perspective on what a “good” milk price is. The highest monthly MPP margin since 2000 was $15.62 in October 2014 with an all-milk price of $24.90 and a ration cost of $9.28 per cwt.If we assume that feed costs remain steady at this level, an all-milk price of $17.28 would yield an $8 margin. An average basis of $2 would convert this $8 margin to a Class III price of $15.28. Why would we even consider protecting a Class III price that is $9 per cwt below last September’s $24.60 close?Because that price may still provide a solid base to a marketing plan in today’s environment. The average of monthly MPP margins since January of 2000 is $8.26. Since January of 2010, the monthly average is $7.39.A substantial number of farms proactively took advantage of the milk pricing opportunities that were available last fall and summer to secure serviceable margins for much of 2015 with futures contracts, LGM-Dairy and the Margin Protection Program. These farm businesses are actively working to preserve the equity that they built over the past year, not allowing it to burn up in an unexpected downturn.On Jan. 1, 2013, open interest on the CME listed 12,203 Class III contracts for the first six months of that year signifying almost 2.5 percent of the total U.S. production for those six months. Jan. 1, 2014 registered 16,987 Class III contracts covering 3.3 percent of total production.On Jan. 1 of this year, Class III open interest had doubled from two years earlier with 27,685 contracts representing 5.3 percent of the expected milk production for the first half of the year. These levels are well below the volume of corn and soybean futures contracts, but dairy managers are learning how to employ futures and option contracts to mitigate their price risk.advertisementLivestock Gross Margin Insurance for Dairy sales this fall were also very strong due to the same robust Class III futures prices. More than half of the dairy farms in the U.S. built a strong marketing plan foundation by registering for the USDA’s Margin Protection Program at some level last fall.We never see the events that dominate price and margin upswings or crashes until after they happen. What are Joe Dairyman’s risks? The banking crisis in 2009 and the drought of 2012 decimated balance sheets on dairy farms across the country, but no one included these events in their six-month price outlook.A crop failure domestically or internationally, caused by drought, flood, frost or any other reason is the greatest risk to profitable margins. This could raise feed costs and squeeze our margins in the U.S., but a drought in New Zealand or Europe could reduce their milk production, increasing the domestic demand for dairy products.International political events can have the same unpredictable positive or negative effect on Joe’s milk check. This is why a sound marketing plan can protect at least a portion of the farm’s production to maintain cash flow during the price troughs.Last September’s futures markets projected MPP margins to be around $9 this spring. Today’s $7 estimates for MPP margins from March through July demonstrate that focusing your marketing plan solely on the outlook is risky because outlooks change constantly.A sound marketing strategy that protects some portion of a farm’s production when the market presents profitable margins, regardless of the outlook, will protect cash flow when the price fundamentals change.Many farms began their 2015 marketing plan last fall. Producers who registered for the Margin Protection Program or bought Livestock Gross Margin insurance for Dairy have some basic protection against escalating feed costs and decreasing milk prices.The larger dairy contract volume on the CME will also enhance additional dairymen’s milk checks as we move through the year. Dairies that grow a portion of their own feed needs have a natural hedge against a feed price spike, and they can buy crop insurance this spring to provide another level of security on the feed cost side.Almost all commodity prices have fallen drastically over the past year. Oil prices fell in half since last year, dropping farm fuel costs. The S&P GSCI commodity index which serves as a benchmark for commodity market investments over time is at 2009 levels.My point is that while a $16 Class III price may not seem appealing after last summer’s record highs, if feed and fuel costs are also protected, a $16 Class III milk price could provide a reasonable margin when you know and manage your costs.Do not panic because milk prices have fallen. Every experienced dairyman knows that a bad situation will only get worse if you lose your composure while working around dairy cattle.Effectively managing milk margins requires the same cool, calm composure during volatile markets that you exhibit as you sort those pens that should not be mixed up or display to that first-calf heifer you are trying to help calve even though she gets up every time you approach her.Think about the margin, not just the price. Your marketing plan can help put price goals and sales targets into perspective while you protect the cash reserves you earned last year. PDIllustration by Kristen Phillips.Alan Zeppaczepp@gmail.comRisk Management Program ManagerCenter for Dairy Excellencelast_img read more

COVID-19 economic stimulus might not be the last word on dairy aid; FMMO dumping contingencies released

September 25th, 2020

first_imgU.S. dairy industry leaders are pleased an economic stimulus package contains provisions to help support the nation’s dairy producers and processors, but they remain hopeful additional financial aid and other USDA policy and program changes will be forthcoming to offset anticipated losses due to COVID-19. The massive, $2 trillion aid package working its way through Congress this week creates a $9.5 billion coronavirus agricultural disaster fund that specifically includes livestock and dairy producers, as well as critical assistance to small businesses that are a key link in the entire dairy supply chain. The bill also provides $14 billion in additional funding for the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) that the USDA can use to assist agricultural producers.advertisementadvertisementEven though dairy is identified as a target area for aid, there is no specific funding level designated for dairy, and spending priorities are left to the discretion of the USDA.While the stimulus package includes crucial assistance to farmers, it is likely not the last step to assist a dairy sector hard hit by COVID-19 economic disruptions, said Paul Bleiberg, vice president for government relations for the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF).“There are absolutely going to be further legislative efforts,” Bleiberg said in a podcast released by NMPF. “Congress may take a recess for a couple of weeks, maybe around the Easter recess, and it may be a little bit longer than it normally is, but I think that work behind the scenes is going to continue.”Other dairy leaders expressed the need for additional measures.”This assistance will be helpful, but it is not enough,” said American Dairy Coalition CEO Laurie Fischer. “The future of the dairy industry is at risk. The industry has lost an estimated $2.85 billion over the last five weeks, a direct loss of income for dairy producers. Our nation’s dairy farmers, who are providing essential food for consumers during this unprecedented time, must be a top priority to receive assistance from the government so they can continue to feed the nation.”advertisement“Dairy farmers are proud to be able to provide wholesome and nutritious dairy products to consumers across the U.S. and beyond. This pandemic has not changed that commitment, but it has already made it more challenging to keep supply chains running smoothly,” said John Rettler, dairy farmer from Neosho, Wisconsin, and president of FarmFirst Dairy Cooperative. “2020 was supposed to the year to begin to recover from the past few … dairy farmers will need significant support to get through this, and they will need it right away.”NMPF outlines other needsIn a letter to U.S. Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue, March 24, Jim Mulhern, NMPF president and CEO, said USDA’s latest 2020 milk price forecast indicates U.S. dairy farmers could see a $2.85 billion decline in milk income compared to the outlook five weeks earlier.“Further drops are possible as the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak spreads,” Mulhern wrote. “The demand shock experienced by our entire economy is turning what initially looked to dairy farmers like the first decent year in the last five into one of potentially widespread economic devastation.”In the letter, Mulhern introduced other steps NMPF sees as necessary to assist dairy producers and processors, including:Additional USDA dairy product purchases to meet increasing demand at food banks and offset lost sales in food service sectors due to school and restaurant closings.Reopening sign-up for participation in the Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) program. Due to the lack of expected payout during the sign-up period, only 47.8% of operations with production history and 56.2% of the volume of established production history were enrolled in DMC for 2020, noted Michael Nepveux, economist with the American Farm Bureau Federation.Since the COVID-19 outbreak, the milk price outlook has changed substantially, as has the forecast for DMC indemnity payments.Read: “Black swan event shakes up Dairy Margin Coverage payment forecast.”advertisementA proposal originally approved in the House version of the economic stimulus bill – but not included in the version approved by the Senate – would also have allowed dairy producers to update their production history under the DMC program.Compensation for possible milk disposal as logistical challenges on the farm and at manufacturing plants may create supply chain disruptions – elements of existing USDA programs could provide the basis for a means to compensate farmers or processors, potentially with an incentive to donate milk when possible. In the past, the Wildfires and Hurricanes Indemnity and Milk Loss (WHIP-ML) Program has assisted producers who have had to dump milk because of contamination from natural disasters. NMPF suggests this program might be refashioned to assist in this situation.Milk dumping contingenciesLooking longer term, Progressive Dairy has heard of some dairy co-ops sending letters to producer members, warning of the potential of production caps and/or dumping of excess milk supplies.FMMO marketing flexibility offeredIn response to questions from the dairy industry, the USDA issued a statement on March 25, saying it will give Federal Milk Marketing Order (FMMO) administrators flexibility to ensure adequate supplies and efficient movement of fluid milk to retail outlets. There have been reports of substantial loads of milk normally used in dairy product manufacturing now being diverted for bottling to fill retail fluid milk demand.A document posted on the Mideast FMMO website outlines some of actions availed to FMMO administrators should local conditions warrant those steps. If requested by milk handlers and approved by market administrators, the actions will initially be implemented for the time period of March-May, as needed. They include:1. The USDA will provide flexibility for the disposal of milk and limit the financial impact to producers. Milk historically associated with an FMMO will be allowed to be dumped at the farm and still be priced and pooled on the FMMO. The pooling handler will need to notify FMMO of any dumped milk.2. Some pooling provisions, shipping and/or diversion limits, of individual orders will be adjusted to accommodate changes in supply and demand due to COVID-19 responses.3. Some fully regulated plants are having difficulty meeting the increased demand at grocery stores and will be allowed to purchase milk from other sources, such as a partially regulated distributing plant, provided the additional milk is pooled and priced on a FMMO.4. If a producer-handler loses their market due to COVID-19, the FMMO will allow these entities to become fully regulated and then revert to their producer-handler status once the market returns to normal.5. If a producer-handler has the capacity to process additional fluid milk for consumers, the FMMOs will lift the limit on the amount of outside milk the producer-handler can purchase as long as the milk is pooled and priced on a FMMO. The producer-handler must still remain under the 3-million-pound threshold in order to keep its producer-handler status.Historically, some FMMOs have authorized the temporary pooling of milk disposed or “dumped” on farms or other nonplant locations during the spring flush, when milk supplies exceeded processing capacity.In those cases, dumped milk volumes were reported under a marketing area’s monthly statistical reports under “Class IV minimum price class.” It represents milk that may have been delivered to the plant and processed to some degree (such as separating the milk retaining the butterfat and discarding the skim portion, or condensing the milk and discarding the skim portion), milk lost in plant manufacturing issues and route returns of packaged milk returned to a plant for disposal.Make sure dumped milk is countedIn a dairy risk management webinar on March 25, University of Minnesota dairy economist Marin Bozic emphasized the need to report any dumped milk volumes, insisting that the milk be identified as “marketed” milk even if there is no payment for it.Those milk weights will be reported to the USDA and incorporated into milk production totals, which are a factor used to calculate quarterly milk income under the Dairy Revenue Protection (Dairy-RP) program.In addition, the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) milk production estimates are used when adjusting annual milk production history increases allowed under DMC.Other federal actionSeparately, the previously approved Families First Coronavirus Response Act provided funding for nutrition programs, including getting milk to students during school closures. Among other federal actions, the U.S. Department of Transportation has relaxed hours-of-service requirements for truckers, and the FDA has announced flexible enforcement of federal veterinarian-client-patient relationship (VCPR) requirements, allowing veterinarians to use telemedicine to address animal health needs during the COVID-19 outbreak.   Dave NatzkeEditorProgressive DairyEmail Dave Natzkedave@progressivepublish.comlast_img read more

Six hundred-plus applicants for Farmington STEAM Academy

September 24th, 2020

first_img Reported by If you applied to send your child to Farmington STEAM Academy, the odds are probably not in your favor.Farmington Public Schools Superintendent George Heitsch said Tuesday that the district received 609 applications for 70 open seats in the K-8 school of choice. A lottery was held Wednesday; selected families will be notified via email later this month.Heitsch said 29 percent of the applications came from Farmington area families with children in either private or parochial schools. The Academy approach integrates sciences, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics.“There’s a market for us to meet a need for, and we’re going to work really hard to figure out how to meet that need,” he said.To that end, officials have gone back to the design phase of bond improvements scheduled for Warner Middle School, to make it more “STEM-like,” Heitsch said.Learn more about Farmington STEAM Academy on the district’s website.Do you appreciate our coverage of this and other local stories? Support Farmington Voice with a monthly pledge or one-time contribution.  admin Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Farmington area Election Day: What you should know

September 24th, 2020

first_img Reported by Farmington area voters will head to the polls on Tuesday, August 7 to choose candidates who’ll run in November and decide the fate of a SMART (Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation) millage renewal.Farmington and Farmington Hills, along with other cities in Oakland County, have adopted the Verity voting system. If you haven’t voted in a while, here’s what to expect: FARMINGTON AREA VOTERS WILL SEE NEW MACHINES, SMALLER BALLOTS.Here’s what you should know:Polls will be open from 7 a.m. until 8 p.m.Local election results will be electronically transmitted to Oakland County and will start showing up at oakgov.com shortly after 8 p.m.You can find your polling location online.Maps and lists of polling places are available on city websites:FarmingtonFarmington Hills: Maps, Precinct LocationsYou can also check with the State of Michigan: https://webapps.sos.state.mi.us/MVIC/.If you live in Farmington Hills, your usual polling place may have changed due to school construction: FARMINGTON HILLS AUGUST PRIMARY PRECINCT LOCATIONS CHANGEYou don’t need a photo ID to vote, but it’ll speed up the process.Voters who don’t have accepted identification can still vote, but must sign an affidavit before casting a ballot. Learn more about ID requirements at michigan.govForgot to turn in your absent voter ballot? You can still vote.You may turn in your AV ballot at City Hall. Or once election workers confirm that your ballot has not already been cast, you can vote at your regular polling place.Still undecided?We’ve put together a collection of links to candidate websites, League of Women Voters Oakland Area guides, and other sources of nonpartisan information here: LEARN MORE ABOUT CANDIDATES, ISSUES ON YOUR AUGUST 7 BALLOTGet more local election information at fhgov.com in Farmington Hills and farmgov.com in Farmington. admin Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)last_img read more

‘Microwave Backhaul to Grow at Near Double the Rate of Leased Line Spending’, Says ABI Research

September 24th, 2020

first_imgGrowing at a compound annual growth rate of 4.3%, capital expenditures on microwave backhaul equipment for mobile networks will reach almost $5 billion in 2012 as mobile network operators upgrade and transition to more cost effective packet microwave systems. The Asia Pacific and Western European regions will continue to dominate the market for microwave equipment with a combined share of 61% in 2017. World-wide Opex from leased T1/E1 and Fiber backhaul represents $6.2 billion in 2012 growing at a CAGR of 2.2%,“We believe mobile network operators are increasingly lowering their TCO by using Capex to replace leased T1/E1 and Fiber backhaul with modern, high capacity, cost effective, packet based microwave links,” says Nick Marshall, principal analyst at ABI Research. Meanwhile Backhaul Opex on leased copper-based T1/E1 lines will continue to shrink at a CAGR of -1.1% reaching only $4 billion in 2017. “T1/E1 based backhaul is no longer compatible with modern 3G/4G mobile networks and will phase out as operators increasingly transition away from legacy TDM systems,” continues Marshall. In a newly published backhaul forecast database ABI Research focused on the last-mile and the access layer of backhaul and includes global and regional forecasts on data consumption, backhaul Opex, Capex for microwave, revenue for leased backhaul access technologies, cumulative macro base station shipments, as well as wireless traffic and bandwidth demands broken out to provide a comprehensive look at the access technologies pertaining to backhaul, as well as data traffic expected. In the report ABI Research provides backhaul forecasts for T1/E1, Ethernet over Copper and Fiber, Cable, Microwave, and WiMAX.last_img read more

MaxLinear MxL265 and MxL267 Full-Spectrum CaptureTM Cable Receivers Selected by ARRIS for Broad Range of Next-Generation DOCSIS® 3.0 Products

September 24th, 2020

first_imgMaxLinear, Inc. announced that ARRIS Group, Inc. has selected the MxL265 and MxL267 Full-Spectrum Capture (FSCTM) digital cable front-end receivers for a new family of DOCSIS 3.0 consumer premises equipment (CPE). Announced this past March, MaxLinear’s MxL265 and MxL267 devices are capable of simultaneously receiving any combination of 16 or 24 DOCSIS channels, respectively, located arbitrarily inside the cable spectrum. Delivering up to 1Gb/s downstream speeds, MaxLinear’s family of FSC receivers replaces several discrete single-channel cable tuners with just one broadband multi-channel receiver. This significantly reduces the power consumption in ARRIS next-generation gateways, minimizes printed circuit board footprint, eliminates expensive external RF components and simplifies the design of ARRIS platforms. ARRIS will demonstrate next-generation DOCSIS 3.0 products using the MxL265 and MxL267 at the IBC 2012 show in Amsterdam, which runs from Sept. 7 – 11. ARRIS will be located in Hall 1, Booth D-41 at the RAI Amsterdam. The demonstration will feature ARRIS 16- and 24-bonded downstream devices delivering throughput speeds up to 840 Mb/s.  “We are pleased to be working with ARRIS on its flagship DOCSIS 3.0 products,” said Brian Sprague, MaxLinear’s Vice President and General Manager for Broadband and Consumer Products. “Video gateway and set-top box markets are evolving rapidly as cable providers strive to meet burgeoning consumer demand for bandwidth and content. We are looking forward to supporting ARRIS with our FSC receivers to facilitate more efficient distribution of video and IP services, faster download speeds, lower power and lower cost designs.” “Our upcoming series of 16- and 24-channel DOCSIS CPE offers the high levels of quality and performance that our customers always expect from us,” said Derek Elder, Senior Vice President and General Manager of the ARRIS CPE business unit. “The MxL265 and MxL267 help to meet those high standards, and the level of integration achieved in the chips plays a big part in making our next-generation products competitive in the market.” Technical Highlights The MxL265 and MxL267 are based on MaxLinear’s industry-leading low-power 40nm CMOS process technology. They each offer a monolithic digital cable front-end with integrated LNA and signal conditioning functions combined with a Full-Spectrum Capture receiver. In full 16-channel receive mode of operation, the MxL265 consumes less than 110 milliwatts (mW) per channel. Likewise, the MxL267 consumes less than 90 mW per channel in full 24-channel receive mode. The extremely low power consumption of these devices eliminates the need for expensive heat removal components such as fans, heat shields and heat sinks inside customer equipment. Both the MxL265 and MxL267 support remote spectrum analyzer functions that report network health and performance parameters, which can be used by cable operators in managing and troubleshooting their networks. This innovative feature allows cable operators to avoid costly technician visits to customer homes by remotely monitoring and diagnosing potential problems with customer premises equipment. Further enhancing the low-power benefits of the MxL265 and MxL267, each device supports a wake-on-WAN capability, which allows the device to wake up a dormant host processor upon receipt of a unique packet from the cable network. This feature eliminates the need to keep customer premises equipment fully powered up during inactivity. The power control flexibility of MaxLinear’s FSC devices enables compliance with the requirements of Energy Star, and the European Code of Conduct for Digital TV Services and Broadband Equipment for both standby and operating modes. The MxL265 16-channel and the MxL267 24-channel DOCSIS 3.0 devices are pin-to-pin compatible in a standard 7mm X 7mm QFN package. Customer samples of the MxL265 and MxL267 are available now with volume production in Q3 2012. Please contact MaxLinear for ordering information.last_img read more

RFaxis Offers Pure-CMOS Bare Die Front End IC for Wi-Fi and Internet of Things

September 24th, 2020

first_imgRFaxis announced that it will be offering its entire product line of pure-CMOS, single-chip / single-die RF Front-end ICs (RFeICs) in bare die form, enabling its customers to further reduce the size and bill of materials (BOM) cost of wireless products for both the Wi-Fi and Internet of Things (IoT) markets. RFaxis has been in mass production of its RFeICs mostly in industry-standard Quad Flat No-Lead (QFN) packages that range from 3x3mm to 1.6×1.6mm in size. These RFeICs serve a wide spectrum of the fast-growing wireless technologies including IEEE 802.11b/g/a/n/ac WLAN, 802.15.4 / ZigBee, Bluetooth / Bluetooth Low Energy, wireless audio / video, home automation, smart energy, and many emerging applications for the IoT.RFaxis is the only company that is shipping pure-CMOS RF front-end solutions with uncompromised performance at utterly disruptive pricing. With the pure-CMOS bare die solution, RFaxis offers a much sought-after solution in terms of size, performance and cost. The ODM/OEM customers while gaining access to bare die, will be able to offer more compact solutions at much lower costs to their end customers.The target markets for RFeICs continue to grow explosively, with Wi-Fi shipments projected to exceed three billion units annually by 2017, and the IoT market to reach at least 50 billion units annually by 2020. Some industry experts forecast that the unit cost of IoT sensor nodes will be nearing the $1 range in order to make them ubiquitous, leaving little room for costly semiconductor components such as GaAs or SiGe.last_img read more

GLOBAL FOUNDRIES to Acquire IBM’s Microelectronics Business for $1.5 Billion

September 24th, 2020

first_imgIBM and GLOBAL FOUNDRIES have announced that they have signed a Definitive Agreement under which GLOBAL FOUNDRIES plans to acquire IBM’s global commercial semiconductor technology business, including intellectual property, world-class technologists and technologies related to IBM Microelectronics (subject to completion of applicable regulatory reviews). GLOBAL FOUNDRIES will also become IBM’s exclusive server processor semiconductor technology provider for 22 nanometer (nm), 14nm and 10nm semiconductors for the next 10 years. The Agreement, once closed, enables IBM to further focus on fundamental semiconductor research and the development of future cloud, mobile, big data analytics, and secure transaction-optimized systems.IBM continues its previously announced $3 billion investment over five years for semiconductor technology research to lead in the next generation of computing. GLOBAL FOUNDRIES will have primary access to the research that results from this investment through joint collaboration at the Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE), SUNY Polytechnic Institute, in Albany, N.Y.As part of this Agreement, GLOBAL FOUNDRIES will gain substantial intellectual property including thousands of patents, making GLOBALFOUNDRIES the holder of one of the largest semiconductor patent portfolios in the world. They will also benefit from an influx of one of the best technical teams in the semiconductor industry, which will solidify its path to advanced process geometries at 10nm and below. Additionally, the acquisition opens up business opportunities in industry-leading radio frequency (RF) and specialty technologies and ASIC design capabilities. GLOBAL FOUNDRIES has robust capital expenditure plans of approximately $10 billion in 2014-2015, with the majority being invested in New York. They have created nearly 3,000 direct jobs in New York and thousands more indirect jobs in the United States since 2009.GLOBAL FOUNDRIES will acquire and operate existing IBM semiconductor manufacturing operations and facilities in East Fishkill, New York and Essex Junction, Vermont, adding capacity to serve its customers and thousands of jobs to GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ workforce. It plans to provide employment opportunities for substantially all IBM employees at the two facilities who are part of the transferred businesses, except for a team of semiconductor server group employees who will remain with IBM. They will also acquire IBM’s commercial microelectronics business, which includes ASIC and specialty foundry, manufacturing and related operations and sales. IBM will reflect a pre-tax charge of $4.7 billion in its financial results for the third quarter of 2014, which includes an asset impairment, estimated costs to sell the IBM microelectronics business, and cash consideration to GLOBAL FOUNDRIES.  Cash consideration of $1.5 billion is expected to be paid to GLOBAL FOUNDRIES by IBM over the next three years.  The cash consideration will be adjusted by the amount of working capital which is estimated to be $200 million.last_img read more